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Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

EHS Pleasant Street Wildflower Project

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New bee species discovered - Bombus Georgius Vilhelmus

31 Jul 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

The amount of honeybees in our wildflowers is amazing. There are clusters of half a dozen or more at times, as well as a generous helping spread throughout. As the first flowers fade away and dry up, and the goldfinches grab their seeds, the newest ones begin blooming. The cosmos get 4+ feet tall and will put on quite a show, as some of the first ones are already demonstrating.

One of the most unusual pollinators I've ever seen is this one: Bombus Georgius Vilhelmus.

er family.

Bombus Georgius Vilhelmus, or GW as we like to call him, came to EHS many years ago, and has been a huge fan of the Wildflower Project, always expressing heartfelt support and admiration. All of us, including our flowers, owe a debt to him. As he moves on to bigger wildflower gardens (today is his last day at EHS), he will be badly missed.

Every week we're getting new types of blooms in the garden, and the biggest ones are yet to come. Stay tuned...

 

Pollinator Factoid: Moths and orchids evolved together. One species of orchid from the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar —Angraecum sesquipedale—had a nectar spur longer than any known Madagascan insect could possibly feed from. The sphinx moth -Xanthopan morganii- actually evolved along with this orchid, to develop an 11 inch long tongue!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Big Picture, New Visitors, and New Blooms

24 Jul 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

The garden continues to grow bigger and is now very visible from the road. People have begun pulling over and sometimes slowing down and even stopping on Pleasant Street to have a look.

The Big Picture

A panorama shot of the wildflowers gives a good appreciation of just how big and full the planting is getting.

New Visitors

Goldfinches are all over the wildflowers eating their seeds, although they won't stay still for a good shot. The one above is off the internet. But the dragonfly on the right was hanging out in the rhododendrons out front, and we got a great one of him. This one appears to be an Eastern Pondhawk, which is known as a ruthless predator of other insects.

New Blooms

Every week we're getting new types of blooms in the garden, and the biggest ones are yet to come. Stay tuned...

 

 

 

Pollinator Factoid: Migrating pollinators follow nectar corridors during their travel. Keep those flyways full of blooming flowers!

 

Check out this dazzling display of butterflies, bees, and flowers

17 Jul 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

Our newest pollinator is a Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus) butterfly, and our most recent bloomer is Cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus).


The Mass Audubon Society has recorded over 100 species of butterfly in Massachusetts. We've seen three or four so far in our wildflower planting. Cosmos is considered a naturalized non-native flower species in the NorthEast. Originally native to Mexico, it is part of the Sunflower family.

This is a pretty amazing display and hopefully you're getting to enjoy it in person as it happens. These latest pics can't wait until next week.



The wildflowers are turning into an awesome display with new types of blooms almost every day. They are supporting a big population of local honeybees as well.

 

 

 

Pollinator Factoid: The number of pollinators in an area is a great indicator of the overall health of an ecosystem.

 

More bees and butterflies too!

15 Jul 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

The show just continues to get better, if you haven't noticed already. Every day the number of honeybees increases exponentially and we get new types of pollinators as well, such as the Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta) butterfly below (right).

The bank is filling in nicely with wildflowers, and drivers can now get a good glimpse of the show from the road.


Here's a view showing some of the new arrivals to the bloomfest (l) as well as our newest pollinator (Red Admiral [Vanessa atalanta]) image (r).

 

 

 

Pollinator Factoid: Bees come from wasps, evolutionally speaking. Actually, so do ants.

 

The honeybees have arrived!

07 Jul 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

Pollinators are hard at work today in our wildflower planting. The honeybees have discovered what is evidently a valuable resource for them, judging from their numbers and all the pollen accumulated on their back legs. The pollen basket or corbicula is part of the tibia on the hind legs of certain species of bees. They use the structure in harvesting pollen and returning it to the nest or hive.

Honeybees doing what they do. It seems our wildflower planting is a big hit with them. If they could stay still long enough to focus we'd have a few more good pics, but far be it from us to stand in the way of their progress.

It's also important to acknowledge all the other pollinators, as well as the big picture of our parking lot turned garden.

More expected rain tomorrow should really help fill in our wildflowers. There also should be more types of blooms coming soon, which you'll of course see in upcoming email newsletters.

This is NOT a mosquito... It's a Midge. And it's also a pollinator. One of the most important pieces of information in the history of mankind is contained in this week's Pollinator Factoid.

 

 

 

 

Pollinator Factoid: All the world’s chocolate depends on midges, tiny two-winged flies, that pollinate the cacao flowers. If you love chocolate, thank a fly!

 

A panoramic view of wildflower blossoms

01 Jul 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

While some areas of our wildflower planting had a tough time of it, others are really flourishing. We've had a couple of good soakings too and expect to see some pretty dramatic results from it very soon.

This early morning panorama shows how blossoms are starting to appear in big numbers as some areas begin to reach as high as two feet.

We'll continue to keep you posted on the progress as our wildflower planting begins to be visible from Pleasant Street.

 

 

 

Pollinator Factoid: About 1,000 of all pollinators are vertebrates such as birds, bats, and small mammals.

 

Wildflower buds are all over our planting area

25 Jun 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

We've had a little bit of cooperation from Mother Nature and there are now wildflower buds all over our planting area. Several flowers are already blooming, but it appears we'll be in for a good show very soon.

At least four different species of flowers are beginning to bloom, with several others yet to show.

As always, we'll keep you updated on things. Until then, please enjoy the show.

 

 

 

Pollinator Factoid: About 75% of all flowering plant species need the help of animals to move their heavy pollen grains from plant to plant for fertilization.

 

Our First Wildflower Blooms!

18 Jun 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

We can't say for 100% certain that this is a wildflower we actually planted. But that certainly appears to be the case. Two things we know for sure: It IS a wildflower, and it IS our first one!

EHS' first wildflower spotted this week.

This effort may be mostly symbolic, but it is still important. As the Center for Food Safety reports:
Last year, U.S. beekeepers reported losing 42.1% of their honey bee hives - the second highest annual loss recorded to date. The situation for bees continues to worsen, but there has been some progress this year.

The key to progress is awareness, and that's what this wildflower project does; raise awareness. So if anyone asks you why we're doing this, it's not just to beautify a strip of land full of cigarette butts, bolts and beer cans... It's to help our pollinators.

 

 

 

Some Pollinator Numbers:

150 MILLION: the number of acres of National Wildlife Refuge habitat that now ban bee-toxic pesticides.

4 MILLION: the number of citizen signatures the Center for Food Safety delivered to the White House, demanding that President Obama take action and protect bees.

500,000: the number of signatures the Center for Food Safety delivered to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, demanding that the agency respond to our listing petition and grant stronger protections for monarch butterflies under the Endangered Species Act.

73: the number of Congressional Representatives who signed on as cosponsors of the Saving America's Pollinators Act last year.

Mother Nature Gives the Wildflowers a Boost

04 Jun 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

Mother Nature stepped in and gave us a huge boost with these relentless rains we had. So if you were home sulking about not being able to go out in the yard and play, here's something that should make you feel a little better about it.


That looks like a weed lurking on the left. But there are also at least two types of wildflowers growing well there.

We added something I call "Green Stuff" to help retain moisture and keep the seedlings cooler. That should give them a little boost. But we still need a lot of watering to keep up with the lack of rainfall, and everyone's help is appreciated. We've had several people in the office including Service Technicians really step up. Thanks to everyone who contributes. It's really appreciated.

 

 

 

We'll keep you updated on things and announce when we'll need some help out there. Until then, please enjoy the show.

Pollinator Factoid: Seventy out of the top 100 human food crops, which supply about 90 percent of the world's nutrition, are pollinated by bees.

A Call for Volunteers to Help Water Plants

27 May 2015

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Hello Everyone,

Because Mother Nature hasn't managed to send much rain at all our way, we could use some extra help with watering our wildflowers. They need a good soaking down, which usually takes about a half hour or so to do, and should be done in the morning or early to later evening.

If you're able to offer some time to do this, please contact Melissa.

Thanks.

 

 

 

We'll keep you updated on things and announce when we'll need some help out there. Until then, please enjoy the show.

Pollinator Factoid: Seventy out of the top 100 human food crops, which supply about 90 percent of the world's nutrition, are pollinated by bees.


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823 Pleasant Street
Norwood,
MA 02062
Email: info@ehspest.com
Phone: 877-507-0698