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Winter - The Buzz - EHS Seasonal Newsletter

Pest Control, MA, RI - Organic Solutions - EHS

The orange and red areas of the house are where there is the most heat loss.
 
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Welcome to the quarterly newsletter of EHS. We know you get tons of spam email so we want you to know there is only one purpose with this newsletter, to educate our valued customers! For this reason you will only receive this 4x per year or seasonally (winter - spring - summer - fall).

We get tons of compliments about our blog and how funny and informative it is, see for yourself by clicking here: EHS Blog

What pests could I possibly have in the dead of a New England winter? Keep in mind that our homes & businesses are approximately 68 degrees or warmer in the winter. These spring-like temps are ideal to enable most pests to survive & thrive. It is mice and other mammals that find your home attractive in winter & that is because of this thermal image. The orange/red areas of the house are where there is the most heat loss. Animals that lived outside in a stone wall, under a deck, in your garage, etc. in the spring/summer/fall see your home as this perfect warm living space just like you do. They look to move inside to survive. Keep in mind mice only need an opening the size of a dime to gain access.

WINTER MOTHS? You may have seen this crazy invasion of moths fluttering around outside. These are Winter Moths and are a seasonal pest in New England. They are harmless as they infest trees. They flutter around at dusk from November thru February. The males are attracted to lights.

STINK BUGS, LADY BUGS, & CLUSTER FLIES: If you had these pests in the fall expect to see some spotty activity inside during the winter months as they are over-wintering in walls & attics. Why? They react to drastic temperature changes. You get an arctic blast & they move away from cold areas to warm areas, typically living areas. You get that one day of unseasonably warm weather & they are like “OH BOY….IT’S SPRING!!!” and they come out. Just vacuum them up, there is nothing else that can be done at this time.

Happy Winter!
G-Dubya
George Williams Jr., A.C.E.
Staff Entomologist


Environmental Health Services, Inc. | 823 Pleasant Street, Norwood, MA 02062 | Call 877-507-0698

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