Enter to Win a Free K9 Bed Bug Inspection

Sign-up now for a chance to win a free 3-D K9 inspection in conjunction with our customary free bed bug consultation*

First Name:*

Last Name:*

Email:*

Company:

Enter Word Verification:*

Captcha Image

*3-D K9 inspection is good for up to 5 units, including one suspect active unit and up to 4 adjacent units.

×

Take a Bite Out of your Bed Bug Treatment Budget

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

Enter Verification:*

Captcha Image

×

Get Your Organic Mosquito Solution Now

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

×

Get Your Organic Tick Solution Now

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

×

Bedbug Infestation Video

Press play to watch the video below.

×
Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

RI, MA EHS Pest Control Blog

RSS -- Grab EHS RSS Feed

Solving Rat, Mouse, Cockroach and Filth Fly Infestations

19 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest - Pest Problem Solution, Boston, MA

Rats, Mice, Filth Flies, American and Oriental Cockroaches ​live​ happily​ in our city sewer systems​ and penetrate foundations is dark, hidden areas not usually visible. ​ Breaks in these sanitary lines may lead to infestations in our homes and businesses. ​Exclusion of the sanitary systems ​and structure ​and permanent repair is the solution. ​

​A well planned investigation solves these ​pest ​problems every time​ without toxic pesticides.​

​Like modern surgury, ​EHS embraces modern technology to ​peer into these hidden areas ​with minimal invasion versus cutting into your home's wall or ceiling with a sawzall. Think of it like arthroscopic surgery versus a large opening with a scalpel.

A High Definition Camera with a fiber optic probe record videos or snap shots of your foundation, what is going on in these hidden cavities or inside of your plumbing.

We are Environmental Health Specialists, Investigators and Pest Detectives​.​

Popular Shrub Linked to Rising Rates of Lyme Disease in Ticks

11 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest - Tick Control

A state scientist says a popular shrub sold at some nurseries and big box stores across Connecticut is being blamed for a rise in the tick population, which is causing an increase in Lyme disease cases in the state.

State scientists reported the rate of Lyme Disease infection in ticks tested so far this year is up by 40 percent compared to 2016. They also allege that the increase is related to the popular landscaping shrub Japanese barberry, also known as Berberis thunbergii.

  • Puerto Ricans Leave for US Mainland as Storm Woes Linger

Darrel Phillips, of Griswold, told the NBC Connecticut Troubleshooters that he and at least six other relatives have had Lyme Disease multiple times. His youngest son, Liam, was diagnosed with Powassan (POW), a rare tick-born disease, at just 5 months old. According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately 75 cases of POW virus disease were reported in the U.S. over the past 10 years. Liam’s diagnosis was the first confirmed case of Powassan in the state, and had the boy’s mother, Desiree Phillips, scared to let her two young sons out of the house for a while.

  • Could Vegas Police Have Taken Down the Gunman Sooner?

In the woods outside the Phillips’ home, the family said they have found acres of Japanese barberry growing wild. It is recognized by the state of Connecticut as an invasive species, but is a shrub in home gardens and commercial landscapes, such as those outside malls, gas stations, and restaurants.

The bush is a haven for ticks according to Dr. Scott Williams, the lead researcher on Japanese barberry for the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES), who said “the ticks are astronomically high abundances, incredibly high.”

  • Before and After Images Show Wine Country Fires' Devastation

Dr. Williams’ team has found dense thickets of Japanese barberry all over the state and said it has invaded ecosystems including forests and wetlands. Their research showed an acre of forest containing Japanese barberry averages a Lyme Disease-carrying tick population that is 12 times higher than forest without it.

The spread of Lyme Disease in barberry thickets is due to white-footed mice, common carriers of the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease, which take shelter amongst the barberry’s dense and thorny branches. One infected mouse passing through can transfer bacteria to any number of ticks, which then pass the infection to their next host. Japanese barberry thickets are also warmer and more humid than is normal, making it easier for ticks to survive.

Taken together, these characteristics compelled Dr. Williams to warn that the Japanese barberry is a threat to public health. He calls it “the ecological perfect storm for tick-borne diseases.”

  • NFL May Change Policy That Players 'Should' Stand for Anthem

Dr. Williams’ research has shown controlling barberry in the woods can reduce the infected tick population by as much as 60 percent, welcomed news to the Phillips’ family. They cannot be sure if the barberry thickets surrounding their home contributed to their son’s bout with Powassan, but Desiree Phillips decided to take action. The Phillips’ plan to clear-cut as much of it as possible.

“The more we can get rid of it, the better off we will be,” Desiree Phillips said.

To learn more on how to contol ticks safely, call EHS Pest.

Source: nbcconnecticut.com

Eastern Subterranean Termites

03 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Termites are the most successful subterranean insect on earth. Our species Eastern Subterranean Termites are quite destructive.

How do you observe an animal that spends its life inside earthen tubes in hidden areas and protect your home or business? With our EHS T1 termite monitors. Our custom wood and cellulose in-ground stations.

EHS Pest - Eastern Subterranean Termites

It's free to all of our clients. Installed in strategic areas it may prevent a large repair bill and lots of aggravation!

Thanks to our Environmental Health Specialist, Derek Dunnally for sharing this observation with our client and preventing a potentially serious problem!

What does it take to be the best?

18 Sep 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Training. Consistent, hands on training.

Our Training Director, Mike Clark provides our Environmental Health Specialists in small groups with nurturing and real world training. It helps EHS to create the best possible customer experience.

EHS Pest Service Team

Plus, everyone gets a delicious lunch after!

Today is Bedbugs, tomorrow Rodents utilizing our New School Pest Management philosophy to solve pest problems.

Is Global Warming Going To Create An Urban Rat Population Explosion?

29 Aug 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest Rodent Expert

Of all of the possible impacts of a warming climate, one that’s probably not considered too often is the potential for an enormous explosion in the number of urban rats throughout many parts of the world.

That’s unfortunate, though, as the potential is certainly there for urban rats to become an enormous problem as temperatures continue to climb, particularly with regard to the spread of many dangerous diseases.

Signs are that things are already veering dangerously close to the point of urban rat populations becoming completely unmanageable. As it is, most attempts to control growing rat populations in heavily urbanized areas of the US have proven expensive and effective only over the short term. This being the case … how much worse can things get?

One of the top experts out there on urban rats, Bobby Corrigan, was recently quoted as saying: “I travel all over the world with this animal, and the amount of complaints and feedback and questions I hear right now are all, ‘We’ve never seen rats in the city like this before,’ he said. ‘They’re all expressing the same concern: Our rat problem is worse than ever.’ ”

Rat populations seem to be growing rapidly, in other words, but individual rats are also “ballooning to the size of human infants” — primarily due to rising temperatures, but also due to growing urbanization and the accompanying profligate human waste of resources.

Something that should explained up front here, by the way, is that resistance to common poisons amongst urban rat populations has been growing rapidly in recent years. That’s another one of the advantages of high and growing population numbers: an ability to rapidly develop resistance to “control methods.”

The New Republic provides more: “What they don’t know is how this all will end. Houston, Texas, is seeing a rat spike this year, and so is New York City. In Chicago, rodent complaints for the early part of the summer have increased about 9 percent from last year, forcing city officials to start sprinkling the streets with rat birth control. Philadelphia and Boston were recently ranked the two cities with the most rat sightings in the country. And it’s not just this year; as USA Today reported last year, major cities saw spikes in rodent-related business from 2013 to 2015. Calls to Orkin, the pest control service, were reportedly ‘up 61 percent in Chicago; 67 percent in Boston; 174 percent in San Francisco; 129 percent in New York City; and 57 percent in Washington, D.C.'”

Those figures are something, aren’t they? Well, we can apparently expect more of the same for the foreseeable future.

Corrigan continues: “Breeding usually slows down during the winter months.” With warming winters, however, the rate of breeding and population expansion surges. “They have an edge of squeezing out one more litter, one more half litter,” Corrigan explained.

The New Republic coverage continues: “One more litter or half litter makes a serious difference when a population boom is not only a nuisance, but a public health and economic crisis. Rats breed like rabbits; as this alarming Rentokil graphic shows, two rats in an ideal environment can turn into 482 million rats over a period of three years. Urban rats caused $19 billion worth of economic damage in the year 2000, partially due to the fact that they eat away at buildings and other infrastructure. Imagine how much they’re costing now.”

So, even not considering the fact that rats are carriers for all sorts of diseases that are dangerous to humans, there’s also the direct impact on infrastructure, which, as revealed above, is shockingly substantial.

So, why isn’t more being done to deal with urban rats? Because it isn’t particularly cost effective to do so. Even New York City’s $32 million program hasn’t and isn’t expected to curtail population growth for more than a few years.

Corrigan noted: “Rats are very incredible, wildly intelligent mammals, and human beings keep going around trying to exterminate (them) as if it’s the opposite. These cities are up against one of the most incredible mammals on the planet, which only stand to increase in number.”

That reminds me of what I read about a relatively recent attempt to reduce urban coyote populations in the Chicago area: even after dropping millions of dollars on the project, and being fairly aggressive in the use of dangerous poisons, the impact on coyote numbers wasn’t substantial. The population was expected to recover completely within only a few years. So, several million dollars down the drain in other words.

The reality seems to be that some animals (those in a position to do so) have become adapted enough to urban environments that doing away with them would be either cost prohibitive or completely impossible. There are some urban regions in the US where this certainly seems to be the case as regards rats, coyotes, and perhaps crows as well. Many insect pests are, of course, in a similar situation.

With antibiotic resistance a looming issue, it seems likely that diseases that have become much less common in the developed world over the last century will be making a comeback, partly on the backs of surging populations of organisms that have become well adapted to human-created urban environments.

Something to keep in mind as you continue watching temperature records being broken — every year for the rest of your life.

For more information about rats, call EHS Pest.

Source: cleantechnica.com

Cartoonist Finds Niche in Pest Control Advertising

28 Aug 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest Services

In the days of modern advertising, savvy consumers have learned to skim over advertisements when they feel the advertiser is pandering to them. This can lead to an unsatisfactory ad campaign — which strays far from the intended result.

This is partially what led Mark Anderson, a cartoonist, to his profession of choice. After dabbling in the art form, contributing cartoons to his high school and college newspapers, he eventually picked up enough traction to quit his day job and become a cartoonist full time. His drawings don’t just show up in the funny pages of local papers, however. They appear in advertisements and in business newsletters, serving clients ranging from The Wall Street Journal to Good Housekeeping.

“Here’s the great thing about cartoons: they are sort of a Trojan horse as far as marketing goes. Basically no one can, or wants to, ignore a cartoon,” Anderson said. “It’s so benign and it’s so inviting, and it’s giving you a little something. It’s telling you a little joke that you can share, forward to a friend or hang up on your refrigerator. You’re being marketed to but you’re also being given something.”

Source: PCT Magazine

America is on the Verge of Ratpocalypse

24 Aug 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest Services, MA, RI

Warmer weather is fueling a rodent surge, straining public health systems and the economy. It's time for the federal government to step in.

Bobby Corrigan is the rat master. Some call him the rat czar. To others, he is simply a rodentologist, or as NBC recently described him, “one of the nation’s leading experts on rats.” Call him what you want; he is mostly alarmed. “I travel all over the world with this animal, and the amount of complaints and feedback and questions I hear right now are all, ‘We’ve never seen rats in the city like this before,” he said. “They’re all expressing the same concern: Our rat problem is worse than ever.”

What they don’t know is how this all will end. Houston, Texas, is seeing a rat spike this year, and so is New York City. In Chicago, rodent complaints for the early part of the summer have increased about 9 percent from last year, forcing city officials to start sprinkling the streets with rat birth control. Philadelphia and Boston were recently ranked the two cities with the most rat sightings in the country. And it’s not just this year; as USA Today reported last year, major cities saw spikes in rodent-related business from 2013 to 2015. Calls to Orkin, the pest control service, were reportedly “up 61 percent in Chicago; 67 percent in Boston; 174 percent in San Francisco; 129 percent in New York City; and 57 percent in Washington, D.C.”

It’s no surprise that rats thrive in cities, where humans provide an abundance of food and shelter. But experts now agree that the weather is playing a role in these recent increases. Extreme summer heat and this past winter’s mild temperatures have created urban rat utopias.

“The reason the rats are so bad now, we believe, is because of the warm winters,” said Gerard Brown, program manager of the Rodent and Vector Control Division of the D.C. Department of Health, at a 2016 rat summit.

Rat pro Corrigan agrees. “Breeding usually slows down during the winter months,” he said. But with shorter, warmer winters becoming more common—2016 was America’s warmest winter on record—rats are experiencing a baby boom. “They have an edge of squeezing out one more litter, one more half litter,” Corrigan said.

One more litter or half litter makes a serious difference when a population boom is not only a nuisance, but a public health and economic crisis. Rats breed like rabbits; as this alarming Rentokil graphic shows, two rats in an ideal environment can turn into 482 million rats over a period of three years. Urban rats caused $19 billion worth of economic damage in the year 2000, partially due to the fact that they eat away at buildings and other infrastructure. Imagine how much they’re costing now.

What’s more, every new litter increases the risk of a rodent-borne disease. A 2014 Columbia University study showed that New York City’s rats carry diseases like E. coli, salmonella, and Seoul hanta­virus, which “can cause Ebolalike hemorrhagic fever,” according to the Washington Post. Rats also carry the rare bacterial disease known as leptospirosis, which recently killed one person and sickened two in the Bronx.

Clearly, the coming ratpocalypse is no longer a city-centric problem. It is threatening the health of millions across the country, costing billions of dollars, and is being fueled by global climate change that the U.S. primarily created. And yet cities—which are expected to hold 70 percent of the world’s population by 2050—are largely dealing with their rodent crises on their own. Why isn’t the federal government stepping in?

The federal government wasn’t always silent on rats. From 1969 to 1982, the Center for Disease Control awarded cities grants under what was known as the Urban Rat Control program, championed by then-President Lyndon Johnson. The program started small, servicing only 19 communities across the country, but eventually grew to serve 65 communities with an annual budget of $13 million, which was matched by state and local governments. While the program did experience some hiccups, it was widely considered successful. Quoting the CDC, the Associated Press reported in 1982: “As a result of the efforts, 7.7 million people now live in rat-free, environmentally improved neighborhoods.”

But President Ronald Reagan eliminated the program, saying the rat problem should be dealt with by individual states. That irked former CDC Director of Environmental Health William Houk, who told United Press International at the time that the program was “one of the more worthwhile projects of the federal government.” Reagan’s decision to cut it, Houk said, “is a classic example of the government doing something with the people instead of for them.”

Rat-plagued cities are now left to their own devices. And they’re not exactly doing a great job. In part, that’s because rats are elusive. As Linda Poon wrote this year for CityLab, “no one really knows how many rats there are. Not in New York City, nor Washington, D.C., nor Chicago—all three of which rank among the most rodent-infested cities in the U.S.” Rats in these urban areas depend on humans for food and shelter, meaning their environment only improves as more and more humans cram into cities with every passing year. And as researchers noted in the Journal of Urban Ecology this year, rats rapidly evolve to resist poisons, the most commonly known form of extermination.

Still, the biggest roadblock, Corrigan said, is that rat eradication programs are just plain underfunded. “It’s been my experience watching cities that people are not willing to pay what it takes to get rid of all the rats affecting a property or a building,” he said. And even when cities are willing to pony up, it’s still not enough. Even in the best-case scenario, New York City’s staggeringly large $32 million program to kill rodents would reduce rat populations in the city’s most infested areas only by 70 percent.

Federal funding could help to close the gap. Officials at the CDC may not be paying much attention now, but they should be, if only because the public health cost of rat infestations has never been fully studied. It’s hard to quantify just how much money rats are costing health systems, Corrigan said, because most people sickened by rats have flu-like symptoms, and many don’t know they’ve been exposed to a rat.

Public health is not just a local issue, and neither is climate change. Researchers admit that it’s extremely difficult to study rats, but many are confident that if temperatures continue to rise, rat populations—and the problems that come with them—will continue to grow. “I personally feel there is a connection with climate change, just because of logic and the biology of rats’ reproductive cycle,” Corrigan said. “Global climate change fits into this discussion in some measurement. How much, I’m just not sure.”

But the Trump administration doesn’t need to accept that climate change will make rodent infestations worse to step in and save the cities from their rats. As the administration has eliminated federal programs to fight climate change, cities have stepped up, aggressively funding their own efforts to slow carbon dioxide emissions. Cities are already fighting battles that shouldn’t be only theirs to fight. The least the federal government could do is chip in for some rat control.

Maybe the best way to get Trump’s attention and sell him on reviving the Urban Rat Control grant program is to stress that there is glory to be had, and for relatively cheap. “Rats are very incredible, wildly intelligent mammals, and human beings keep going around trying to exterminate [them] as if it’s the opposite,” Corrigan said. “These cities are up against one of the most incredible mammals on the planet, which only stand to increase in number.” For a mere $13 million (plus inflation), Trump could stop the ratpocalypse before it begins.

To learn more about rat control, call EHS Pest.

Source: newrepublic.com

Fleas in Arizona test positive for plague

15 Aug 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

TAYLOR, Ariz. - The infectious disease that killed millions during the Middle Ages has been found again in Arizona.

Fleas in Navajo County have tested positive for the plague, KTVK reported. One week ago, fleas on prairie dogs in Coconino County tested positive for the disease.

EHS Pest - Arizona Plague Video

Click here to play video

Properties are set to be treated and officials will monitor the region to see if they need to take additional steps.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the plague is caused by Yersinia pestis.

Normally people get the illness from being bitten by a rodent carrying the bacteria or by handling an infected animal. Antibiotics can treat the illness, but without prompt treatment it can cause serious illness or death.

There are three types of plague that doctors can watch for: bubonic plague, septicemic plague and pneumonic plague. In all types, patients can have fever, headache, chills and weakness.

To learn more about Arizona Plague and how to prevent this infectious disease, contact EHS Pest.

Source: fox25boston.com

Man orders a cappuccino, gets a side of cockroach

14 Aug 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

A Manhattan man claims in a lawsuit his cappuccino at a swanky Upper East Side steakhouse came with a nasty addition: a large cockroach.

The insect was a nightmarish way to end a meal at The Arlington Club, where dinners can easily hit the $500 mark, said Steven Fleming, who brought friends to the eatery in April.

His pals were interested in opening a restaurant, so Fleming wanted to show them the place launched by star chef Laurent Tourondel in 2012.

They chowed down on salad, steak, and a glass of wine before ordering dessert and coffee, he said.

“I took a sip of my cappuccino, I felt something disgusting in my throat, and then something crunchy,” Fleming, 43, told The Post. “And then I spit it out and I was like, ‘Oh my God.’”

Fleming, who is now suing The Arlington Club in Manhattan Supreme Court, snapped a couple of pictures before running outside to vomit on Lexington Avenue, he said.

He claims he then spent 12 hours in the emergency room with a variety of symptoms, including nausea and high blood pressure.

“We want to make sure we hold this restaurant accountable, and that this doesn’t happen to anyone else,” said his lawyer, Michael Joseph. “For the prices they’re charging the very least they could do is make sure the customers don’t have bugs in their food. We think New Yorkers deserve better.”

Fleming, who runs the executive search firm Wall Street Options, said the incident “really grossed me out.”

“On the surface, it looks like a very nice place,” he said. “I thought this would be a good example of something relatively trendy and with above average food. … I’ve been going to restaurants for 20 years in New York City and nothing like this has ever happened to me.”

A manager at The Arlington Club, where Tourondel is no longer the chef, declined comment, adding he was unaware of the lawsuit.

To learn more about cockroaches and how to safely get rid of them, call EHS Pest.

Source: nypost.com


Environmental Health Services, Inc.Environmental Health Services, Inc. $$

823 Pleasant Street
Norwood,
MA 02062
Email: info@ehspest.com
Phone: 877-507-0698