Enter to Win a Free K9 Bed Bug Inspection

Sign-up now for a chance to win a free 3-D K9 inspection in conjunction with our customary free bed bug consultation*

First Name:*

Last Name:*

Email:*

Company:

Enter Word Verification:*

Captcha Image

*3-D K9 inspection is good for up to 5 units, including one suspect active unit and up to 4 adjacent units.

×

Take a Bite Out of your Bed Bug Treatment Budget

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

Enter Verification:*

Captcha Image

×

Get Your Organic Mosquito Solution Now

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

×

Get Your Organic Tick Solution Now

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

×

Bedbug Infestation Video

Press play to watch the video below.

×
Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

RI, MA EHS Pest Control Blog

RSS -- Grab EHS RSS Feed

A team of ecologists discovered that urban birds may be inserting cigarette butts into the lining of their nests in order to repel arthropods. The scientists published their findings in the journal Biology Letters. Chemicals in the tobacco leaves are known to repel parasitic mites. Researchers examined the nests of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), measuring the amount of cellulose acetate, a component of cigarette butts. The more there was of it, the fewer parasitic mites were found.

Heat traps were used to see whether the repellent effect of cigarette butts was related to their nicotine content or other features. The traps, which use heat to lure parasites close, were fitted with cellulose fibers from smoked and unsmoked cigarettes.

The devices with unsmoked butts had many more parasites than devices with smoked butts, which contained more nicotine. In nests that contained bird eggs, traps with unsmoked butts caught on average more than twice as many parasites.

Source: Nature.com

George Williams,
General Manager - Staff Entomologist

Pest Control, RI, Pest Control, MA

Pest Control, RIPest Control, MA 


Environmental Health Services, Inc.Environmental Health Services, Inc. $$

823 Pleasant Street
Norwood,
MA 02062
Email: info@ehspest.com
Phone: 877-507-0698