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Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

RI, MA EHS Pest Control Blog

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Pantry Pests - Weston, MA

31 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

The term pantry pest are usually insects that infest stored products such as grains, beans, pasta, cornmeal, dried fruits, spices, other dry goods and even animal hides.

Indian Meal Moths are the most common insect we are asked to address for clients. Dermestid Beetles, Saw-toothed grain beetles, Cigarette Beetles, Red and Confused Flour Beetles, Rice Weevils are also common. Every insect has food preferences, some are shared.

Once the infesting insect(s) species is/are identified, you may be able to narrow your search for which product(s) may be the source of the problem.

Don’t forget to check the pet food, bird seed and fish food in the garage or other remote areas. This is quite often the root of the problem that has migrated into other areas of your home.

The picture shows a major grain beetle infestation in an old, unused tub of coy fish food that had migrated from the garage into the clients pantry.



If you want to get rid of those pantry pests safely, call EHS Pest.

Rats and Mice Love Gappy Doors! - Boston, MA

30 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest - Rat Proofing

Rats and Mice love gappy doors! A half inch or twelve millimeters can allow a rat inside and a quarter inch or six millimeters in large enough for a mouse! Smaller gaps are often enlarged to these sizes by rodent gnawing.

The door in this photograph leads into a dark alley with several open dumpsters less than fifteen feet away. It is extremely vulnerable and needs immediate repair to prevent Rat and House Mouse invasion.

Experience will guide us modify the foundation, then use a combination of leveling cement, threshold and rodent-proof door sweep to keep this property safe and prevent future infestations.

For more information on how to rodent-proof your properties, call EHS Pest.

Bedbugs in Hotels

27 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest Services, MA, RI

Attending the #NEPMA #PestWorld convention became more interesting for our Leigh Fryxell. Armed with a flashlight and other inspection tools, she scoured her hotel room for #cimex and it wasn’t long until she made a discovery out in the open. It was dead and semi smooshed. The room had be cleaned by housekeeping so why it on a glass panel wasn’t clear.

The front desk staff wasn’t shocked or apologetic. They offered another room and a call to their PMP. Just another bedbug complaint? Business as usual.

If you have bedbug problems and you want to get rid of them safely, call EHS Pest.

Solving Rat, Mouse, Cockroach and Filth Fly Infestations

19 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest - Pest Problem Solution, Boston, MA

Rats, Mice, Filth Flies, American and Oriental Cockroaches ​live​ happily​ in our city sewer systems​ and penetrate foundations is dark, hidden areas not usually visible. ​ Breaks in these sanitary lines may lead to infestations in our homes and businesses. ​Exclusion of the sanitary systems ​and structure ​and permanent repair is the solution. ​

​A well planned investigation solves these ​pest ​problems every time​ without toxic pesticides.​

​Like modern surgury, ​EHS embraces modern technology to ​peer into these hidden areas ​with minimal invasion versus cutting into your home's wall or ceiling with a sawzall. Think of it like arthroscopic surgery versus a large opening with a scalpel.

A High Definition Camera with a fiber optic probe record videos or snap shots of your foundation, what is going on in these hidden cavities or inside of your plumbing.

We are Environmental Health Specialists, Investigators and Pest Detectives​.​

Popular Shrub Linked to Rising Rates of Lyme Disease in Ticks

11 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest - Tick Control

A state scientist says a popular shrub sold at some nurseries and big box stores across Connecticut is being blamed for a rise in the tick population, which is causing an increase in Lyme disease cases in the state.

State scientists reported the rate of Lyme Disease infection in ticks tested so far this year is up by 40 percent compared to 2016. They also allege that the increase is related to the popular landscaping shrub Japanese barberry, also known as Berberis thunbergii.

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Darrel Phillips, of Griswold, told the NBC Connecticut Troubleshooters that he and at least six other relatives have had Lyme Disease multiple times. His youngest son, Liam, was diagnosed with Powassan (POW), a rare tick-born disease, at just 5 months old. According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately 75 cases of POW virus disease were reported in the U.S. over the past 10 years. Liam’s diagnosis was the first confirmed case of Powassan in the state, and had the boy’s mother, Desiree Phillips, scared to let her two young sons out of the house for a while.

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In the woods outside the Phillips’ home, the family said they have found acres of Japanese barberry growing wild. It is recognized by the state of Connecticut as an invasive species, but is a shrub in home gardens and commercial landscapes, such as those outside malls, gas stations, and restaurants.

The bush is a haven for ticks according to Dr. Scott Williams, the lead researcher on Japanese barberry for the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES), who said “the ticks are astronomically high abundances, incredibly high.”

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Dr. Williams’ team has found dense thickets of Japanese barberry all over the state and said it has invaded ecosystems including forests and wetlands. Their research showed an acre of forest containing Japanese barberry averages a Lyme Disease-carrying tick population that is 12 times higher than forest without it.

The spread of Lyme Disease in barberry thickets is due to white-footed mice, common carriers of the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease, which take shelter amongst the barberry’s dense and thorny branches. One infected mouse passing through can transfer bacteria to any number of ticks, which then pass the infection to their next host. Japanese barberry thickets are also warmer and more humid than is normal, making it easier for ticks to survive.

Taken together, these characteristics compelled Dr. Williams to warn that the Japanese barberry is a threat to public health. He calls it “the ecological perfect storm for tick-borne diseases.”

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Dr. Williams’ research has shown controlling barberry in the woods can reduce the infected tick population by as much as 60 percent, welcomed news to the Phillips’ family. They cannot be sure if the barberry thickets surrounding their home contributed to their son’s bout with Powassan, but Desiree Phillips decided to take action. The Phillips’ plan to clear-cut as much of it as possible.

“The more we can get rid of it, the better off we will be,” Desiree Phillips said.

To learn more on how to contol ticks safely, call EHS Pest.

Source: nbcconnecticut.com

Eastern Subterranean Termites

03 Oct 2017

Posted by John D. Stellberger

Termites are the most successful subterranean insect on earth. Our species Eastern Subterranean Termites are quite destructive.

How do you observe an animal that spends its life inside earthen tubes in hidden areas and protect your home or business? With our EHS T1 termite monitors. Our custom wood and cellulose in-ground stations.

EHS Pest - Eastern Subterranean Termites

It's free to all of our clients. Installed in strategic areas it may prevent a large repair bill and lots of aggravation!

Thanks to our Environmental Health Specialist, Derek Dunnally for sharing this observation with our client and preventing a potentially serious problem!


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Email: info@ehspest.com
Phone: 877-507-0698