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Forward Thinking Pest Control

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Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

RI, MA EHS Pest Control Blog

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200K mice plagued the islands. Now, none

26 Mar 2018

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS Pest Control - Ma, RI

A subantarctic archipelago is making "huge news": The New Zealand Herald reports there are officially no more mice on the country's Antipodes Islands, which once housed up to 200,000 of the rodents.

They caused a big threat to the World Heritage Site by preying on native birds, bugs, and plants, and the five-year effort to do away with them got an assist from the public, with the "Million Mouse Project" fundraising campaign bringing six figures.

The Department of Conservation explains that cereal bait laced with rodent toxin was dropped via helicopter on the island during the winter of 2016. A team scoured the island last month looking for any mice and found none.

Both Radio New Zealand and NPR note the mice originally found their way to the Antipodes either on 19th-century ships or via a shipwreck and proceeded to purge the island of at least two insect species, as well as to displace some seabirds to other islands.

The initiative in the Antipodes isn't a stand-alone: The island nation has also gotten rid of other invasive species in the name of boosting biodiversity, including goats, rats, cats, rabbits, and a local meat-eating weasel.

New Zealand's ultimate goal is to rid itself completely of all invasive pests by 2050, per Nature.

To learn more about how to get rid of mice and rats safely, call EHS Pest.

Source: FOX

Here's Why Cockroaches can Survive Just About Anything

22 Mar 2018

Posted by John D. Stellberger

EHS - Pest Control, MA, RI

The genome of the American cockroach has been sequenced for the first time, revealing why these creepy-crawlies are such tenacious survivors.

The roach (Periplaneta americana) has widely expanded gene families related to taste and smell, to detoxification and to immunity, compared with other insects, according to a new study published March 20 in the journal Nature Communications.

"It makes total sense in the context of the lifestyle," said Coby Schal, an entomologist at North Carolina State University who was part of a team that last month reported an analysis of the genome of the German cockroach (Blattella germanica). Many of the gene families that expanded in the American cockroach were also expanded in the German cockroach, Schal said. That makes sense because both species are omnivorous scavengers that can thrive on rotting food in seriously unsanitary environments.

Discriminating tasters

The American cockroach is a denizen of the sewers. It originally hails from Africa, but was introduced to the Americas in the 1500s. Unlike the German cockroach, which is a major pest found almost exclusively in human dwellings, the American cockroach mostly ventures only into the basements or bottom levels of buildings, Schal said. [Photos: Insects and Spiders That May Share Your Home]

Both roaches, though, are hardy survivors, and their genes hold the keys as to why. In the new study, researcher Sheng Li of South China Normal University and colleagues found that American cockroaches have the second-largest genome of any insect ever sequenced, right behind the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria), though a good 60 percent of the roach genome is made up of repetitive segments. Gene families related to taste and smell were much larger than those of other insects, and the researchers found 522 gustatory, or taste, receptors in the roach. German cockroaches are similarly well-equipped, Schal said, with 545 taste receptors.

"They need very elaborate smell and taste systems in order to avoid eating toxic stuff," Schal said.

Hardy survivors

American cockroaches also had a larger-than-average suite of genes devoted to metabolizing nasty substances, including some of the ingredients in insecticides. German cockroaches have similar adaptations, Schal said. Both species developed these genetic changes long before humans came on the scene, he said. Thanks to their tendency to live among toxin-producing bacteria and to eat plant matter that might hold toxic substances, roaches were "pre-adapted" to the insecticides that humans throw at them, Schal said.

The American cockroach also had an expanded family of immunity genes, likely another adaptation for surviving unsanitary environments and fermenting food sources, Li and colleagues wrote. Finally, the roach had a large number of genes devoted to development, like genes responsible for synthesizing the insect's juvenile hormone or the proteins in its exoskeleton. This made sense, the researchers wrote, since American cockroaches can grow up to 2 inches (53 millimeters) long and molt many times to reach that size.

A greater understanding of the cockroach genome could help researchers come up with new ways to control pest species, the researchers wrote. One example, Schal said, is the Asian cockroach (Blattella asahinai), a close relative of the pesky German cockroach that lives outdoors and doesn't bother humans much at all. It would be interesting to see if there are any differences between the Asian and German cockroach genomes that might explain why one is dependent on human-made environments and the other is not, Schal said.

"There are 5,000 described species of cockroaches, and now we have two [full] genomes," Schal said. "So we need more."

For more information about cockroach pest removal and how to get rid of them safely, contact EHS Pest.

Source: fox news

McCormick and Schmick's manager suing for $999,999 after getting bit by venomous spider

20 Mar 2018

Posted by John D. Stellberger


A restaurant manager in Oregon is suing a pest control company for $999,999 after he allegedly was bit by a poisonous spider.

Scott Clement runs McCormick and Schmick’s Harborside at the Marina, an upscale restaurant and bar in Southwest Portland. In the lawsuit filed March 8, Clement is suing Ecolab, Inc., the company contracted by the restaurant to perform regular pest control, exterminator services and “proactive prevention.”

According to the lawsuit, Clement made multiple attempts to contact Ecolab during the summer and early fall of 2017, requesting they spray for spiders, but the company didn’t respond.

Ecolab allegedly “knew the restaurant required immediate pest elimination and services and “knew that spiders at the restaurant posed a threat to the health and safety of the restaurant’s customers, employees and other visitors” but failed to perform their contractual duties.

Clement decided to take matters into his own hands and clean away the spiders from the outdoor dining area. In the process, he was bitten by a venomous brown recluse spider, causing him weakness, fever and nausea that resulted in three days of hospitalization, the suit states.

While the Oregon Department of Agriculture notes there are at least 500 species of spiders in the state, the most common being the hobo spider, giant house spider and western black widow, The Oregonian reports there aren’t any brown recluses.

The suit claims that due to the spider bite and related symptoms, Clement was unable to return to work for an “extended period of time,” resulting in lost wages.

While it’s unclear how the plaintiff came up with the $999,999 amount, the suit states that damages include medical bills and related expenses totaling $25,000, in addition to lost wages during his recovering in the amount of $3,000, a lost bonus of $3,000 and loss of about two weeks’ paid vacation worth $4,500.

“Plaintiff has also suffered non-economic losses and damages, including pain, suffering, anxiety and emotional distress, in an amount to be proven at trial,” the suit reads.

For safe spider removal, contact EHS Pest.

Town Says Cape Cod Woman to Blame for Ongoing Rat Problem

08 Mar 2018

Posted by John D. Stellberger


Cellphone video recorded in late May by a neighbor shows rats running around a Cape Cod backyard, but the rodent issue has continued into the winter.

The health director in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, is calling it the most difficult case he has ever dealt with.

"Now that [the rats] found a source of food and water, they've stayed right there," said Bruce Murphy, Yarmouth's health director.

Murphy says Judith Adelchi on Nauset Lane is to blame.

"She's feeding them on her property," he said.

"I personally have never seen rats," Adelchi contested.

According to Murphy, his department launched an investigation after receiving complaints from neighbors in the summer.

"I would never feed a rat purposefully," said Adelchi. "I would never do that. Who would do that?"

Murphy said he has been on the property several times and has seen numerous rats. He accuses Adelchi of trying to bait the rats with bird food.

"She said they were her friends," said Murphy. "She was lonely. She wanted to feed them as a source of her friendship to the animals."

The home is owned by Mark Pallantino, who is also related to Adelchi. According to court documents, he hired an exterminator, but the rats keep coming back.

Murphy sent a cease and desist letter to the home instructing Adelchi to stop feeding the rats, but the problem has continued.

That has forced the town to file a criminal complaint against Pallantino. He is facing three charges, including having unsanitary conditions and failure to exterminate rodents.

Pallantino is due in court on Jan. 3.

For safe rat solution, contact EHS Pest.

Source: NBC


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