Enter to Win a Free K9 Bed Bug Inspection

Sign-up now for a chance to win a free 3-D K9 inspection in conjunction with our customary free bed bug consultation*

First Name:*

Last Name:*

Email:*

Company:

Enter Word Verification:*

Captcha Image

*3-D K9 inspection is good for up to 5 units, including one suspect active unit and up to 4 adjacent units.

×

Take a Bite Out of your Bed Bug Treatment Budget

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

Enter Verification:*

Captcha Image

×

Get Your Organic Mosquito Solution Now

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

×

Get Your Organic Tick Solution Now

Fill out the form below to contact us today!

Name:*

Email:*

Phone:*

Company:

Location:*

Comments:

×

Bedbug Infestation Video

Press play to watch the video below.

×
Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

RI, MA EHS Pest Control Blog

RSS -- Grab EHS RSS Feed

EHS Ant Control, MA, RI

Arizona State University researchers developed a new computer model to manipulate several ant behaviors and to see how they affected the social structure of a colony. This model explains the complexity and diversity of social hierarchies in ants.

In many animal species, physical battles and other aggressive acts determine a certain “pecking order.” In the world of ants, fights that involve biting and restraining often determine winners and losers.

But what about battles that do not result in a pecking order, but instead lead to groups of winners and losers? Does this require a new type of aggressive interaction?

“We were curious as to whether dueling behavior in ants results in a winner and a loser, or if it is a winner-winner interaction that allows workers to express aggression without requiring a loser,” said Jürgen Liebig, associate professor at Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences and senior author of a new study published in the current online issue of American Naturalist.

To help answer this question, the researchers developed a new computer model to manipulate several ant behaviors and to see how they affected the social structure of a colony. This model explains the complexity and diversity of social hierarchies in ants.

The scientists began by examining the behaviors and social hierarchy of the Indian jumping ant (Harpegnathos saltator). When a colony’s queen dies, the female workers engage in ritual fights to establish dominance. Although these battles can be fierce, they rarely result in physical injury to the worker ants. Ultimately, a group of approximately 10 workers will establish dominance and become a cadre of worker queens called “gamergates.”

A social hierarchy like this is called a “shared-dominance hierarchy.” Other ant societies establish pecking orders in which one individual is dominant and all others share a subordinate status.

To learn more about ants, contact EHS Pest.

Source: Arizona State University Press Release


Environmental Health Services, Inc.Environmental Health Services, Inc. $$

823 Pleasant Street
Norwood,
MA 02062
Email: info@ehspest.com
Phone: 877-507-0698