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Forward Thinking Pest Control

Call Us At 877.507.0698
Forward Thinking Pest Control

EHS Pest Control

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If you or your pet has been outside this spring, then chances are you have seen a tick. Tick season is in full swing. From now until early July, the risk of being bitten by the poppy seed-sized black-legged tick that transmits Lyme disease is high.

What is Lyme disease?

Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium, transmitted by tick bites. It can cause complications such as meningitis, facial palsy, arthritis and heart abnormalities if untreated. It usually occurs in the summer months. Often, but not always, individuals develop a large circular rash around or near the tick bite. Symptoms include chills, a fever, a headache, fatigue, a stiff neck, swollen glands and muscle and/or joint pain. Symptoms usually appear within a month of exposure.

A physician should be consulted if Lyme disease is suspected. Antibiotics are very effective in treating the disease, but early diagnosis improves the outcome.

Cases increasing

The rising incidence of Lyme disease is due to a number of factors, including increased tick and deer populations, increased recognition of the disease, increased establishment of residences in wooded areas and the increased potential for contact with ticks. Ticks, including the black-legged tick, are expected to be abundant this summer. Heavy snow cover ensured that survival rates over the winter would be high.

The black-legged tick

Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a black-legged tick, formerly known as a deer tick.

The ticks become infected when they have a blood meal courtesy of an infected wild rodent (its host). If the tick later bites a human, the tick may transmit the disease to a person. The tick can carry other harmful diseases, but the incidence of infection is low compared with Lyme disease. The chance of getting infected is greatest during the tick’s nymph stage, from May to July, when it is smaller than the head of a pin and hard to detect.

Adult ticks can also transmit the disease, but at 1/16 to 1/8 inch long, they are easier to see and can subsequently be removed before the bacteria can be transmitted. If a tick is attached to the skin for less than 24 hours, the chance of getting Lyme disease is extremely small.

Removing a tick

Use thin-tipped tweezers or forceps and grasp the tick as close to the skin surface as possible. Pull the tick straight upward with steady even pressure. Do not use petroleum jelly, heat from matches or gasoline or other chemicals to remove ticks.

After removal:

  • Disinfect the area with alcohol; a topical antibiotic may also be applied.
  • Save the tick in a sealed container for reference or possible testing. Note the site and date of the bite.
  • Watch for signs and symptoms of Lyme disease and be aware that localized tick bite reactions may develop rapidly and can sometimes resemble a Lyme disease rash. Consult your physician if you are in doubt.

Statistics

  • 30,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported every year
  • 60 percent of black-legged ticks were found to be infected with Lyme disease in 2012

Prevention

  • Wear light-colored clothing with long pants tucked into socks to make ticks easier to detect and keep on the outside of the clothing.
  • Use a DEET or permethrin-based repellent.
  • Keep away from leaf litter, low-lying brush and wooded areas. Minimize contact with vegetation.
  • Carefully inspect the entire body, including hair. Wash and dry clothing. A tick may survive a washing but it won’t survive an hour in the dryer.
  • Practice landscape management by keeping lawns mowed, reducing leaf litter, brush and weeds at the edge of the lawn and eliminating areas where rodents will nest.

Tick Repellents:

  • For black-legged ticks use a repellent with a 30 percent concentration of DEET on skin and clothing. DEET is safe when used according to directions, but it is not recommended for use on children under 2 months old. Apply sparingly to young children. DEET is not water-soluble and will last several hours.
  • Use permethrin-based repellents only on clothing or fabrics such as netting or tents. It works primarily by killing ticks on contact. Wash immediately with soap and water if it gets on the skin. Do not apply while clothing is being worn. Spray clothing and let dry before wearing.
  • Botanicals and other “green” repellents have not been shown to be effective in deterring tick bites.
  • Contact EHS Pest Control in Norwood.

Protect your pets

Pet owners can keep their pets safe by avoiding tick habitat, reducing ticks on the animal and daily tick checks. There are a variety of products on the market to repel or kill ticks on your pets, available over the counter and through your veterinarian.

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Environmental Health Services, Inc.Environmental Health Services, Inc. $$

823 Pleasant Street
Norwood,
MA 02062
Email: info@ehspest.com
Phone: 877-507-0698